$3.3M in seed funding goes to Vancouver company fighting period and puberty stigmas

Apr 16 2019, 5:01 pm

A pair of Vancouver-based sisters and their female-forward company have secured $3.3 million during their latest round of Series Seed Funding.

Bunny and Taran Ghatrora are the sister-duo behind Blume, a Vancouver-based company that specializes in wellness products.


Their goal is to set a new standard for self-care and to normalize the experiences of puberty and periods. Through their various offerings, ranging from organic pads and tampons to calming essential oils and deodorants, that’s just what they’re doing.

“Seventy-nine percent of us use the same products that our moms did,” the pair explains. “That means that 79% of us are still using outdated, potentially problematic products simply because we were introduced to them when we were younger.”

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This latest round of funding is led by Grace Chou and Victoria Treyger, partners at Felicis Ventures, with participation from Victress Capital. Other notable investors include Panache and Eric Reis, author of the Lean Startup.

“Capital from this round will be used to accelerate brand growth through product and employee expansion,” reads a press statement from the company.

Other plans include increased marketing efforts to produce more educational content.

“We plan to double down on building community and our educational platform,” says Taran Ghatrora, co-founder and CEO. “With only 26 states mandating sex ed, and Ontario reverting back to a pre-1993 sex ed curriculum, we believe there is a space for a brand to help girls navigate this time in a meaningful way.”

Alongside the significant funding, Bunny and Tran say their greatest triumph thus far is “hearing from customers about how products have helped them.”

“We’ve had customers let us know that our cramp oil helps them get out of bed on days their period pain would have normally held them back. And mothers email us and tell us that receiving Blume is the first time their daughters felt comfortable talking about [their bodies].”