10 Canadian places that make you feel like you're in "Dune"

Oct 29 2021, 10:07 pm

Canadian filmmaker Denis Villeneuve’s¬†Dune: Part One has been playing on the big screen and dominating the box office lately.

The breathtaking landscapes of the planet¬†Arrakis inspired us to bring together a list of our favourite surreal landscapes in Canada that make you feel like you’re on another world.

Here are the most incredible Canadian landscapes where you might be able to feel like you’re in the Dune movie:

Osoyoos

 

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This town is BC’s “pocket desert.” It has its own unique hue and it seems like no matter where you stand you’re surrounded by desert-like hills.

Red Rock Coulee

 

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Red Rock Coulee Natural Area has these strange, spherical, and reddish sandstone concretions that might look more at home on Arrakis than in Alberta.

Drumheller Badlands

 

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Head to Drumheller’s badlands and find yourself some hoodoo formations to feel like you’ve stepped onto the set of a new sci-fi movie.

Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park

 

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The cultural history and magical geological formations make Writing-On-Stone Provincial Park worth a stop on your Alberta road trip.

Cavendish Beach

 

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Prince Edward Island’s unique red earth means its landscapes could instantly swap in for a sci-fi set in a pinch.

Bonnechere Caves

 

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Hidden in Eganville, Ontario, these other-worldly caves remind Dune nerds of the Cave of Ridges from the film. No spoilers!

Athabasca Sand Dunes Provincial Park


The most Dune like landscape could be the Athabasca Sand Dunes in Saskatchewan where you can see dunes as high as 30 metres.

Hopewell Rocks

 

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New Brunswick’s Hopewell Rocks Provincial Park is one of the most out-of-this-world places on the East Coast you have to see at least once.

Dinosaur Provincial Park

 

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Alberta’s badlands are extremely cinematic. Take a drive to Dinosaur Provincial Park or plan a camping trip to explore it for yourself.

Mount Thor

 

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Mount Thor’s sheer rock face creates the greatest vertical drop on planet earth, but it looks so surreal that it may as well be from a sci-fi movie. In real life, you can find it in Nunavut.

Sarah AndersonSarah Anderson

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