City of Portland launches website to support local businesses

Nov 20 2020, 11:36 am

Local businesses are the heart and soul of Portland. And as the city transitions into four weeks of closures on gyms and indoor dining, among other things, there are lots of ways to support local businesses, from getting takeout from local eateries to taking online classes at local fitness studios.

The City of Portland is taking steps to keep its local businesses thriving in the next few weeks and beyond, with the launch of the Shop Small PDX website.

Led by the city’s economic development agency, Prosper Portland, the website directs visitors to hundreds of local businesses so that residents can make sure their buck is going to the right place, especially as holiday shopping kicks in.

You can filter by type of business or by delivery options. The website advertises everything from online marketplaces to outdoor night markets to ceramic jewelry stores and caterers.

“Buying from local businesses is good for our city, our neighborhoods, our economy, and our fellow Portlanders. When you shop small and local, you’re buying from your neighbors and friends. You’re keeping nearby coffeehouses and retailers open,” said Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler in a statement. “I’m asking all Portlanders who can, to open their wallets and get started! Let’s be the change that keeps Portland thriving.”

The announcement comes just as other organizations are also stepping up to help local businesses stay active amid new closures. The organization PDXSOS has started an initiative called the #PortlandPledge, where locals can advertise the need to shop local this season and promise that they won’t do anything but.

On a larger scale, the state of Oregon is also stepping up to the plate to support local businesses in the state with its “Give the Gift of Oregon” campaign, announced by Governor Kate Brown on Wednesday. The campaign includes gift ideas from Travel Oregon and the Build Oregon Marketplace, an online platform advertising various products from Oregon makers.

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