This is the vehicle that's stolen more often than any other in Canada

Dec 11 2018, 1:48 pm

The Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) has released its annual list of Canada’s most frequently stolen vehicles, and the recent findings revealed that auto theft is up 6% across the country.

New Brunswick tops the lists with a 28% increase in auto thefts, followed by Ontario with a 15% increase, Quebec up 7%, Alberta up 6%, British Columbia up 2%, and Newfoundland and Labrador up 1%. 

What’s being stolen and why:

According to the report, Ford F350 trucks are the most commonly stolen vehicle across the country.

Ford.com

In Ontario, thieves target Chevrolet trucks and high-end SUVs, including the Tahoe, Silverado, and Suburban.

In Atlantic Canada, the Nissan Maxima, Chevy Silverado and Jeep Liberty are the most commonly stolen, according to Henry Tso, Vice-President, Investigative Services, IBC.

As for when vehicles are being stolen, ICB says New Year’s Day is the most common time for vehicles to be stolen across the country, mostly because people are travelling with vehicles filled with gifts.

The report also revealed that many break-ins also happen because thieves want to steal the car’s contents or take personal information to use for things like insurance fraud and identity theft which is on the rise, according to ICB.

How to protect yourself:

To help eliminate auto theft, IBC says motorists can keep their vehicles safe by taking the following steps:

  • Never leave your vehicle running when unattended.
  • Park in well-lit areas.
  • When parking your car, always close the windows and lock the doors.
  • Put valuables and packages in the trunk, where they’re out of sight.
  • Keep your car in the garage at night.
  • Don’t leave personal information in the glove box.
  • Take your insurance and ownership documents with you when you park your vehicle.

The IBC report uses data compiled by members across the country from 2016-2017, the most recent information available,

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