Environment Canada calls for seven straight days of sunshine in Vancouver

Jul 17 2020, 2:08 pm

The next few days in Vancouver are expected to be nothing short of beautiful.

According to Environment Canada, the upcoming forecast is calling for high temperatures and a return to typical summer weather.

Sunny skies are expected to carry through the weekend and well into next week, although they’ll be mixed with clouds on Wednesday or Thursday. Daytime temperatures will dwell in the mid to high twenties, with overnight temperatures in the mid-teens.

environment canada

Vancouver’s seven-day forecast. (Environment Canada)

Matt McDonald, meteorologist at Environment Canada, says that while it won’t necessarily be a heatwave, it’s definitely “the weather we’ve all been waiting for.”

“June and the beginning of July have been really, abnormally wet,” he tells Daily Hive. “Particularly that first week of July, if you remember Canada Day.”

McDonald says that the next few days will showcase “the typical temperatures that we see at this time of year.”

“While it might feel amazingly sunny and incredibly warm, it’s actually just normal,” he notes. “What we saw previously was the abnormal part.”

He explains that the streak of warm weather is due to a ridge of high pressure that draws northwesterly flow into British Columbia.

“It’s favourable circulation for beautiful warm weather, but it’s not exactly the perfect setup for extremely hot weather.”

Temperatures will be slightly warmer moving into next week, with inland temperatures closing in on the 30s.

McDonald adds that it’s not just local residents that are being affected by Vancouver’s previous string of wet weather. BC’s agriculture has been affected, such as raspberries growing mould due to wet conditions and cherries bursting from excess moisture in the Okanagan.

“On the positive side, the fire danger rating is almost nonexistent,” he points out. “It’s been a super quiet summer from a wildfire perspective and we’re finally also getting out of the woods from a flooding perspective.”

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