Fresh faces in Ottawa: Meet 35-year-old MP Brad Vis

Dec 4 2019, 1:01 pm

The federal election may be over, but are Millennials really getting any representation in parliament?

Daily Hive teamed up with the Forum for Millennial Leadership (FML) –a non-partisan organization that works to elect Millennials regardless of party, ideology, or level of government — to find out.

According to FML founder Gavin Dew, the 2019 election represented an incremental but significant step in the right direction for the representation of Millennials in Parliament. Generation X, meanwhile, saw a major boom in its representation, as the number of Baby Boomers was reduced.

“Millennials, who make up 35% of the eligible voters in Canada, went from holding 13% of the seats in Parliament to 17%, said Dew. “In a few places, there was more significant growth, like in BC where we went from bad to, well, less bad. In BC we had just one MP under 40 before the election and now we have four, with all three major national parties covered off.”

FML found a total of 58 Millennials were elected in 2019 out of a total 338 (FML does estimate on some candidates as age is not required to be public knowledge).

We connected with some of Canada’s Millennial MPs to find out more about why they ran and the change they want to achieve over their time in office.

 

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Meet Brad Vis

Riding: Mission-Matsqui-Fraser Canyon, BC
Party:  Conservative Party of Canada
Age: 35

Instagram: @brad_vis
Twitter: @BradleyVis

What motivated you to run?

A long story but I realized that in our democracy those who put themselves forward can achieve success!

What made you a supporter of your party?

The Conservative Party is made up of individuals who believe in strong community involvement and personal responsibility.

How did you connect with young voters in your riding?  

Door knocking is the best way to connect with everyone!

Why does it matter to have equal representation from younger Canadians in government?

Millennials are paying for the spending decisions of our parents. Here in BC, young families are facing real affordability challenges. Even if you follow the rules, get a degree, land a good job, it’s hard to afford a home and save!

What are you hoping to achieve during your term in office?

Being Mission-Matsqui-Fraser Canyon’s representative in Ottawa, not Ottawa’s representative in the riding.

What advice would you give to young people considering getting involved in politics?

Knock on doors, be open, compassionate and ready to embrace the challenges and opportunities. We are so blessed to live in Canada but our society is only as strong as those who participate.