It's going to cost you more to visit national parks across Canada this year

Jan 7 2022, 5:23 pm

Planning a trip to one of the many prestigious national parks across Canada this year? Be prepared to shell out just a few extra bucks to make it happen.

Parks Canada says a fee increase of 4.2% will bring them closer to those charged by nearby tourism providers. The price hike will aid Parks Canada in providing similar services and experiences as local businesses.

Examples include special guided tours, cross-country skiing, golfing, and access to hot pools.

The increase in dollar terms will vary per service.

The increase also applies to the popular Discovery Pass, with the changes looking like this:

Until December 31, 2021:

  • Family/Group (up to seven people in a vehicle) – $139.40
  • Adult (18-64) – $69.19
  • Senior (65+) – $59.17

As of January 1, 2022:

  • Family/Group (up to seven people in a vehicle) – $145.25
  • Adult (18-64) – $72.25
  • Senior (65+) – $61.75

Daily admissions also rose in price, with the changes reflected like this:

Until December 31, 2021:

  • Family/Group (up to seven people in a vehicle) – $20
  • Adult (18-64) – $10
  • Senior (65+) – $8.40

As of January 1, 2022:

  • Family/Group (up to seven people in a vehicle) – $21
  • Adult (18-64) – $10.50
  • Senior (65+) – $9

Listed prices include applicable taxes. Admission is free for youth 17 and under to all Parks Canada administered places.

If you want to see how much something costs this year, you can search by national park, national historic site, national urban park or national marine conservation area here. You can also filter searches by province and territory.

There are currently 38 National Parks and eight National Park Reserves across the country, with at least one park in each province and territory.

The Parks Canada website lists all of the National Parks and National Park Reserves and National Marine Conservation Areas plus the 140 National Historic Sites that they manage.

Parks Canada began a cycle of adjusting fees for inflation every two years based on the 2017 Services Fees Act requirements. 

Parks Canada says keeping pace with inflation allows them to maintain the high standards of experiences and services to visitors, while also delivering world-class conservation programming.

The fee cycle began on January 1, 2020.

Laine MitchellLaine Mitchell

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