Loss of clothing donation bins forecast to cost Big Brothers $500,000

Jan 24 2019, 5:43 pm

After the decision by both Vancouver and the District of West Vancouver to remove all clothing bins in their communities following the deaths of two individuals who died after getting stuck in them, Big Brothers of Greater Vancouver (BBGV) said it has temporarily removed all of its 180 clothing bins across the Lower Mainland in order to “re-evaluate their design and make any recommended improvements.”

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However, the move doesn’t come without a cost.

In a release, BBVG said that for its organization,  clothing donations – both home pick up and bin collections – account for over 50% of the funding needed to run the essential mentoring programs.

“Removal of the bins means that the organization anticipates losing $500,000 annually, a significant amount and critical funding used to support the mentorship programs,” the BBVG said.

Noting that it provides one-on-one mentorship and group programs for over 1,200 children and youth each year, the BBGV said it is mostly community funded and it is currently evaluating the situation, noting that over 250 children could be impacted.

With the removal of the bins, the BBGV said there are still many ways the public can donate to the organization:

  • Donate used clothing and household items and book a donation pick up through phone at 604.526.2447, visiting the organization’s website, or by email
  • Drop off donations at the organization’s office (#102-1193 Kingsway, Vancouver, BC) or at Value Village stores
  • Host a community clothing drive at your workplace or school, email to find out how
  • Donate funds online
  • Talk to your strata council about setting up an indoor bin in your building

“We are asking for the public’s support during this critical time to continue to donate used clothing and small household items to Big Brothers,” said BBGV Executive Director Valerie Lambert. “We don’t want the children in our programs to lose the chance of having a mentor in their lives.”