Wonderful Washington: There's so much to do at Deception Pass State Park

Feb 12 2020, 1:54 pm

Start your camping season right by heading out to Washington’s most-visited state park: Deception Pass State Park.

With dozens of nooks and trails to explore, children, adults, and furry friends will never run out of things to do.

For your own safety, please make sure you are prepared before heading out on your next adventure. Information on how to prepare for your trip and stay safe while on your hike is available from waparks.org and parks.wa.govAlways remember to leave no trace, pack out what you pack in, stick to designated trails, and refrain from feeding wildlife — and please note that irresponsibly taken selfies (even if they look great for the ‘gram) can be fatal

 

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Where is it? 

Deception Pass is located near Whidbey Island. It was named Deception Pass by Captain George Vancouver, the first European to identify the area.

 

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How do you get there? 

Although it seems ridiculously far, Deception State Park is only an hour-and-a-half drive away from Seattle.

Take the I-5 North from 4th Avenue, and follow it to exit 230. From exit 230, drive to WA-20 W where you’ll get to Deception Pass State Park.

What’s there? 

We suggest starting your trip at the scenic vista parking lot at the end of the Deception Pass Bridge. From there, you’ll be able to see the bridge and beautiful waters of Deception Pass.

From the vista viewpoint, drive further into the park and start exploring.

Make use of a sunny day by swimming, fishing, or simply sitting by the water — the park has 77,000 feet of saltwater shoreline and 33,900 feet of freshwater shoreline to enjoy.

Those looking to hike will enjoy the various options of hiking on the beachfront, through forests, and out along the bluffs.

We recommend staying the night and camping out at one of the various campgrounds. There are enough trees to set up hammocks in privacy, and most are close enough to the water to walk to the pier.

 

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