Over 1,000 homes proposed near Gateway Station in Surrey (RENDERINGS)

Jan 7 2020, 6:00 pm

Another major redevelopment for Surrey’s emerging city centre area is set for consideration by city council later this month.

A rezoning and development application seeks to turn a five-acre site at 13335 King George Boulevard — the northwest corner of the intersection of King George Boulevard and Bolivar Road, just 600 metres north of SkyTrain’s Gateway Station — into a five-building residential complex. The development site is currently vacant.

13335 King George Boulevard Surrey

Site of 13335 King George Boulevard, Surrey. (Google Maps)

13335 King George Boulevard Surrey

Site of 13335 King George Boulevard, Surrey. (Google Maps)

This includes a 26-storey tower, a 37-storey tower, a 31-storey tower, and two six-storey buildings.

There will be a total of 1,042 homes, with a unit mix of 112 studios, 412 one-bedroom units, 424 two-bedroom units, and nine penthouse units, as well as 29 two-bedroom townhouses and 56 three-bedroom townhouses.

13335 King George Boulevard Surrey

Artistic rendering of 13335 King George Boulevard, Surrey. (Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership Architects)

13335 King George Boulevard Surrey

Artistic rendering of 13335 King George Boulevard, Surrey. (Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership Architects)

Residents will have access to 26,000 sq. ft. of indoor amenity space and 55,000 sq. ft. of outdoor amenity space located at ground level, including an orchard plaza incorporating fruit trees, a play hill with natural play elements, and an interactive stormwater feature that captures on-site stormwater.

There will minor non-residential uses, entailing a 5,673-sq-ft childcare facility and a 603-sq-ft cafe.

The latest concept for the project, designed by Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership Architects, is a revised version of what was originally considered by city council in 2018.

13335 King George Boulevard Surrey

Cancelled 2018 design of 13335 King George Boulevard, Surrey. (Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership Architects)

“The City Centre Plan envisioned this site as the leading edge of the gateway area, with low-rise buildings providing an appropriate transition to the existing single family neighbourhood to the north,” reads a city staff report.

“Building heights are generally intended to increase gradually towards the Gateway SkyTrain Station in keeping with the tapered skyline approach of the City Centre Plan. The proposed development results in a more dramatic increase in height transition from a single family form to a high-rise form of development.”

13335 King George Boulevard Surrey

Artistic rendering of 13335 King George Boulevard, Surrey. (Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership Architects)

13335 King George Boulevard Surrey

Artistic rendering of 13335 King George Boulevard, Surrey. (Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership Architects)

Moreover, in keeping with city council’s request for the development to “incorporate iconic architecture,” the tower heights have been increased to allow for slimmer towers and greater height variation.

“The design vision for the building exterior, as noted by the architect, is influenced by the varied texture of tree bark, expressed through irregular patterns of transparent and opaque materials, offset massing in the tower forms, and balcony projections. The intended result is to add visual interest, texture and individuality to the towers,” continues the staff report.

13335 King George Boulevard Surrey

Artistic rendering of 13335 King George Boulevard, Surrey. (Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership Architects)

13335 King George Boulevard Surrey

Artistic rendering of 13335 King George Boulevard, Surrey. (Musson Cattell Mackey Partnership Architects)

The project, as proposed, creates 923,000 sq. ft. of total floor area, generating a floor area ratio density of 4.2 times the size of the lot.

Additionally, three underground levels will contain 1,054 parking stalls. The stalls allocated for residents can be reduced by up to 10% 0f the minimum required for the city centre, if the proponents provide $20,000 for each parking space shortfall towards the city’s Off-Street Parking Reserve Fund and the Alternative Transportation Infrastructure Reserve Fund or enter into an agreement with MODO to provide on-site parking spaces and a financial contribution to acquire electric-battery car share vehicles.