Toronto marks "tragic milestone" as coronavirus deaths reach 1,000

Jun 18 2020, 11:52 am

The City of Toronto reported 1,000 deaths due to COVID-19 on Thursday.

“This is a sad milestone in our ongoing fight against this devastating virus,” Mayor John Tory said in a statement.

“It is important that we recognize each life lost here mattered to someone in our city – they were our loved ones, our relatives, our neighbours, our coworkers, and our fellow Torontonians.”

Tory noted that while the efforts to combat the virus have made a difference and saved thousands of lives, the threat to more innocent lives remains “very real.”

The mayor also said that many of the 1,000 deaths are seniors and have occurred in long-term care homes.

“We will never forget the need for long-term changes to be made to protect our seniors,” Tory said.

“We owe it to the memory of all those 1,000 souls to continue to fight this virus, to continue to follow public health advice to protect our families, and to make sure our city comes back stronger than ever.”

The sentiments were shared by Councillor Joe Cressy, who called it a “tragic milestone.”

“Each death is an unimaginable loss for their loved ones and community. I want to extend my condolences to every Torontonian who has been affected by the devastation of COVID-19. We have reached this many deaths. We must do everything we can to prevent more,” the Chair of the Toronto Health Board said.

There are 13,661 cases of coronavirus in the city, an increase of 73 cases since yesterday, with 11, 501 recovered.

Currently, there are 276 people hospitalized, with 72 in ICU.

“This is an immeasurable loss experienced by so many people across our city and beyond.  On behalf of everyone at Toronto Public Health, we offer our sincerest condolences to everyone who has lost a friend, family member or loved one to COVID-19,” Toronto’s Medical Officer of Health Dr. Eileen de Villa said.

The City reminds residents of the importance of adhering to Toronto Public Health’s advice to wash their hands often, stay within their social circle of no more than 10 people, practise physical distancing, or wear a face covering or non-medical mask to protect others when in settings where physical distancing cannot be maintained.