New ship, same route: Titanic II to deliver an 'authentic Titanic experience'

Oct 23 2018, 5:50 pm

In large part due to the storytelling of our boy Leo and Kate Winslet, we have all heard the ill-fated story of the RMS Titanic, which struck an iceberg off the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador and sank on April 15, 1912. This tragedy occurred just four days after the ship set sail, claiming the lives of over 1,500 people who perished in the cold waters of the Atlantic Ocean.

titanic

The sinking Titanic. (Shutterstock)

It was just announced that in 2022, one hundred and ten years after the original Titanic first left the harbour, a replica of the Titanic is being built to sail along the same route as the original ship leaving from Southampton in the United Kingdom and ending in New York City.

Hopefully this time with a happier ending.

The Titanic II was re-designed by Australian mining tycoon Clive Palmer and the shipping company Blue Star Line, which had originally planned this sail for the 100-year anniversary but were delayed because of financial disputes.

The Titanic II will offer the same “authentic experience” as the original boat, “providing passengers with a ship that has the same interiors and cabin layout as the original vessel while integrating modern safety procedures, navigation methods and 21st-century technology to produce the highest level of luxurious comfort,” says Palmer.

 

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It is estimated that this replica will cost $500-million to create and will carry over 2,400 passengers and 500 crew members on its trans-Atlantic journey. They have promised that unlike its ill-fated predecessor, the Titanic II will have enough lifeboats on board on the very, very very slim chance that another iceberg crosses its path.

After its maiden voyage, Titanic II has plans to sail around the world and become the image of luxury ocean travel as was once hoped the original Titanic would have been.

Best of luck to this one! Lightning can’t strike in the same place twice, right? … right?

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