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BC Election 2017, Politics, News

My Vote, My Future: Navneet Sekhon on BC Election 2017

BC Election 2017, Politics, News

My Vote, My Future: Navneet Sekhon on BC Election 2017

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DH Vancouver Staff Apr 27, 2017 1:30 am 2,479

Ahead of the BC election, Daily Hive is profiling young voters from across the province. Want to join in and share your thoughts? Email [email protected], subject line: My Future.


Who are you?

Navneet Sekhon.

How old are you?

23.

What do you do?

Medical Biochemist.

Where do you live?

Surrey.

Have you voted before?

Yes, every opportunity since I turned 18.

Do you plan on voting this time?

Of course!

Does your family influence how you vote?

My first vote for sure, they basically told me who to pick. Once I began post-secondary, I started to research on my own and made my choice that way.

How closely do you follow BC politics?

Honestly, not until about voting time.

Do you know who your local candidates are?

Yes, there are two at the moment. I know the NDP and Liberal members.

[For the record, in the Surrey-Panorama riding, Puneet Sandhar is running for the Liberals, Jinny Sims for the NDP, and Veronica Greer for the Greens.]

Can you name the three party leaders?

Christy Clark (for the) Liberals again and John Horgan for the NDP. But no idea about who the Green party leader is. [For the record, that’s Andrew Weaver.]

Would you ever consider running for office?

No, I don’t think it would be something I see myself enjoying. It’s a lot of work and you really have to put yourself and your family out there to be scrutinized. It takes very strong personalities to run in these elections and I would not say I fit the criteria.

What issues do you care most about?

Jobs and the Economy 

I just graduated this past year and the struggle of getting a full-time job pertaining to my education has been difficult.

Even now, 10 months later, I still have to do part-time at multiple places, which does not qualify me for health benefits.

I think jobs and affordability are very important because they branch into the other issues.

For example, no job means no income, no income means I can’t afford transit passes or rideshare rates.

I can’t afford to buy environmentally conscious items or contribute to the cause. If I do have a job, the majority of my income will go towards a mortgage or rent.

Affordability and Housing 

As far as affordability, I will probably never be able to afford a house in the Lower Mainland working part-time jobs.


Are you a young British Columbian and eligible to vote in the BC election? We would love to profile you. Email [email protected], subject line: My Future, to find out more.

Daily Hive is your home for BC Election coverage throughout the campaign period. To access our full BC Election coverage click here: Battleground BC.

See also

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DH Vancouver Staff
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