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Health & Fitness, Great Outdoors, Life

54 hikes to do this spring in and around Metro Vancouver

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Vincent Plana Mar 07, 2018 3:17 pm 12,722

With Winter slowly coming to a close, it will soon be time to stretch out those legs and hit the great outdoors. Rain or shine, it’s fine time to chase some views and conquer the trails.

To get you started, we’ve put together a bumper list of hikes of all varieties across Metro Vancouver, the North Shore, Bowen Island, the Fraser Valley, and the Sea-To-Sky.

From lush green forests to roaring waterfalls, from rocky beaches to epic sunsets, you’re sure to find some inspiration to get you outdoors. Happy hiking!

For your own safety, please make sure you are prepared before heading out on your next adventure. Information on how to prepare for your trip and stay safe while on your hike is available from North Shore Rescue and AdventureSmart.

Vancouver

Foreshore Trail

What: This trail through Pacific Spirit Regional Park passes through Vancouver’s famously nudist Wreck Beach. Along the way, you’ll enjoy scenic views and see an old WWII tower designed to warn Vancouver of an impending attack. Note that more than half of the trail follows the beach, which is rocky, slippery, and can be challenging during high tides.

How long: 3 hours or 5 km

Where: Starts and ends at the Acadia Beach parking lot on NW Marine Drive, just past Pacific Spirit Regional Park at UBC, Vancouver

Get there: A 20-minute drive from downtown Vancouver, or take bus 44.

Stanley Park

Stanley Park in the mist (Zhenwang Wang/Shutterstock)

Stanley Park in the mist (Zhenwang Wang/Shutterstock)

What: The quintessential Vancouver hike through a beautiful urban park. Stanley Park is full of many networks of trails for both cycling and hiking. Venture into the forest to find Beaver Lake, and watch out for over-friendly raccoons!

How long: 2 hours or 6.5 km

Where: Starts near the Rose Garden and loops back around in Stanley Park, Vancouver

Get there: A 10-minute drive from downtown Vancouver, or take bus 19.

Pacific Spirit Regional Park

What: Pacific Spirit Regional Park offers a huge network of easy trails in an oasis of green forest, trickling creeks and muddy bogs in Vancouver’s South Endowment Lands. Watch out for dog walkers on the trails as you flex your legs in the forest.

How long: 3 hours or 10 km

Where: Starts and ends at the park entrance on 16th Avenue next to Camosun Park, Vancouver

Get there: A 10-minute drive from downtown Vancouver, or take the SkyTrain to King Edward, then bus 33.

Iona Beach Regional Park

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What: This hike follows a long, narrow beach and grass area along the mouth of the Fraser River, offering views of the Georgia Strait and a dramatic descent into hundreds of logs washed up along the shoreline.

How long: 1.5 hours or 6 km

Where: Starts and ends at the parking lot off Iona Island Causeway, Vancouver

Get there: A 35-minute drive from downtown Vancouver.

North Shore

Baden Powell Lynn Canyon To Grouse

What: This route hugs the North Shore’s steep mountain slopes, taking you through scenic forests and over several creeks – with quite a lot of stairs and uphill sections. Recommended all year round.

How long: 5 hours or 10 km

Where: Starts at a steep set of stairs between the main and overflow parking area in Lynn Headwaters Regional Park and ends at the base of Grouse Mountain.

Get there: A 40-minute drive from downtown to Lynn Headwaters Regional Park, or take the Seabus plus bus 228 instead. Get home from Grouse on bus 236 plus the Seabus.

Baden Powell Deep Cove To Lynn Canyon

What: This hike begins with a walk up to Quarry Rock, offering sweeping views of Deep Cove and Indian Arm, then continues onto lush forest, scenic canyons and waterfall views. Recommended all year round.

How long: 5 hours or 12 km

Where: Starts at the Baden Powell Trailhead on Panorama Drive in Deep Cove and ends at Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge.

Get there: A 30-minute drive from downtown, or take the Seabus plus buses 229 then 212 instead. From Lynn Canyon, take bus 229 then the Seabus.

Norvan Falls


What: This hike will have you clambering over streams, tree roots, and rubble as you make your way through groves of old-growth Cedar – but it’s all worth it when you get to the falls. Recommended all year round.

How long: 5 hours or 14 km

Where: Starts and ends at the parking lot of Lynn Headwaters Regional Park.

Get there: A 40-minute drive from downtown, or take the Seabus plus bus 228 instead.

Brothers Creek Loop


What: This hike, open to the public but on private property, offers glimpses of waterfalls and takes you past the Candelabra Fir, a huge tree that towers over the surrounding forest. Not recommended before April.

How long: 4 hours or 7 km

Where: Starts and ends on Millstream Road near Henlow Road in the British Properties area.

Get there: A 30-minute drive from downtown, or take buses 250 then 254 instead.

Big Cedar And Kennedy Falls Trail

What: A rugged hike into the back-country, across roots, creeks and fallen trees, past an old-growth cedar, with several trees growing on it, and ending at a spectacular waterfall. Recommended all year round.

How long: 5 hours or 10 km

Where: Starts and ends at the top of Mountain Highway.

Get there: A 30-minute drive from downtown, or take bus 210 instead.

Lighthouse Park

Lighthouse Park in West Vancouver (JamesChen/Shutterstock)

Lighthouse Park in West Vancouver (JamesChen/Shutterstock)

What: Lots of short, easy trails offering breathtaking ocean views, huge, old-growth Western Red Cedars, and the picturesque picnic spot of Starboat Cove.

How long: Up to 2 hours or 6 km

Where: Starts and ends at Lighthouse Park parking lot – Beacon Lane, West Vancouver.

Get there: A 40-minute drive from downtown, or take bus 250 all the way there instead.

Quarry Rock

What: A classic North Shore hike, up wooden stairs, over tree roots and small creeks, among Douglas Fir and Hemlock trees, to a rocky outcrop and beautiful views of Deep Cove.

How long: 1.5 hours or 3.8 km

Where: Starts and ends at the Baden Powell Trailhead – Panorama Drive, Deep Cove.

Get there: A 30-minute drive from downtown, or take the Seabus plus buses 239 then 212 instead.

Capilano Pacific Trail

What: This easy upward trail follows the Capilano River, taking you from pavement, rocky shores and beaches, past steep cliffs, and through thick rainforest to the imposing Cleveland Dam.

How long: 2 hours or 7.5 km one way

Where: Starts at Ambleside Beach in West Vancouver, ends at the Cleveland Dam in North Vancouver.

Get there: A 15-minute drive from downtown, or take bus 250 or 251 to a stop nearby instead.

Recommended: All year round

Lynn Loop

What: Enjoy a forest hike among Cedar and Hemlock trees, with views of Vancouver Island and some of the Gulf Islands, then stroll back along the gushing waters of Lynn Creek.

How long: 1.5 hours or 5.1 km

Where: Starts and ends in Lynn Headwaters Regional Park – Lynn Valley Road, North Vancouver.

Get there: A 40-minute drive from downtown, or take the Seabus then 228 bus instead.

Cypress Falls

What: This easy hike takes you along Cypress Creek, through forests of moss-covered, old-growth trees, past views of two gorgeous waterfalls as they pour into the canyon below.

How long: 1.5 hours or 3 km

Where: Trail starts and ends at Cypress Falls Park – Woodgreen Place, West Vancouver.

Get there: A 30-minute drive from downtown, or take bus 253 Caufield all the way there instead.

Maplewood Flats

Purple Martins at the Maplewood Flats (John Lowman/Wild Bird trust of BC)

Purple Martins at the Maplewood Flats (John Lowman/Wild Bird trust of BC)

What: The trail through Maplewood Flats Conservation Area offers picnic tables, scenic views, and rocky terrain. Managed by the Wild Bird Trust of BC, it is also a popular bird watching park – look out for the more than 200 species of birds spotted in the area annually.

How long: 45 minutes or 2.5 km

Where: Starts and ends in the Maplewood Flats parking lot off the Dollarton Highway in North Vancouver.

Get there: A 20-minute drive from downtown Vancouver or take buses 209 then 212.

Whyte Lake

What: Whyte Lake Park is a small, peaceful lake in the hills above Horseshoe Bay, in the largest park in West Vancouver. The trail to the lake is surrounded by wetlands, creeks and old-growth forest and ends at a small lakeside dock. Watch out for snow on the boardwalks.

How long: 2 hours or 5 km

Where: Starts and ends at the metal gate in the gravel parking area just off Westport Road, off Woodgreen Drive, in West Vancouver.

Get there: A 30-minute drive from downtown Vancouver.

Twin Falls

What: Twin Falls are on the Baden Powell Trail, near Lynn Valley Suspension Bridge. They’re easy to get to and there’s a wooden bridge viewing platform, which gets pretty busy in the summer.

How long: 20 minutes or 1 km

Where: East of the Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge in Lynn Headwaters Regional Park.

Get there: A 40-minute drive from downtown to Lynn Headwaters Regional Park, or take the Seabus plus bus 228 instead.

Whytecliff Park

Whytecliff Park in West Vancouver (Taylor McColl/Shutterstock)

Whytecliff Park in West Vancouver (Taylor McColl/Shutterstock)

What: This park in West Vancouver boasts spectacular views of Howe Sound, a myriad of easy trails weaving through the forest, plus a beach, island area and chance to go scuba diving.

How long: 1.5 hours or 2 km

Where: Starts and ends at the top of the overflow parking lot off Marine Drive near Horseshoe Bay, West Vancouver

Get there: A 45-minute drive from downtown Vancouver.

Fisherman’s Trail

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What: A lush trail that descends into the forests of the Lower Seymour Conservation Reserve and ends at the Mid Valley Viewpoint. The trail is fairly long, offers a fantastic forest view, and is wide enough to accommodate both hikers and bikers.

How long: 5 hours or 12 km

Where: Walk to the east side of the parking lot area and look for a trail marked with a sign for Homestead Trail.

Get there: A 40-minute drive from downtown Vancouver.

Lower Hollyburn

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What: Although the trails near the top of Cypress are covered with snow until the summer, the lower elevations are free game earlier in the season. The trails pass by several gorgeous lakes: blue Gentian Lake, West Lake, and First Lake.

How long: 4.5 hours or 10 km

Where: The trail starts at the Cypress Mountain lookout point. Visitors can park at the lookout and walk east towards the outhouse.

Get there: A 40-minute drive from downtown Vancouver.

Capilano Canyon

What: This easy trail offers beautiful views of Grouse Mountain and the Lions in the distance, as you walk through hemlock and fir trees, clambering over tree roots, surrounded by rainforest. You can also stop at a salmon hatchery on the way. Note this is a free trail in Capilano River Regional Park, separate from the famed Capilano Suspension Bridge.

How long: 1 hour or 2.6 km

Where: Starts and ends at Cleveland Dam off Capilano Road, North Vancouver

Get there: A 30-minute drive from downtown, or take the Seabus across to North Vancouver then bus 236.

Rice Lake

What: This is a calm, quiet lake, full of life, and natural beauty, on the edge of the Lynn Headwaters Regional Park in North Vancouver. There are several viewpoints and trails around the lake with benches to relax and take in the natural beauty of the area.

How long: 1 hour or 3 km

Where: Starts and ends at the parking lot north of Capilano College, on Lillooet Road in North Vancouver

Get there: About 40 minutes’ drive from downtown Vancouver, or take the Seabus across to North Vancouver then bus 228

Bowen Island

Mount Gardner

One of the helicopter pads on top of Mount Gardner. Good place to relax after hiking up the mountain!

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What: This hike on Bowen Island takes you through a meadow to Killarney Lake and up a steep forested trail to spectacular viewpoints overlooking the Howe Sound, the Sunshine Coast, West Vancouver, and Burrard Inlet.

How long: 7 hours or 17 km

Where: Starts and ends at the ferry terminal at Snug Cove, Bowen Island

Get there: A 45-minute drive from downtown Vancouver to Horseshoe Bay, then a 20-minute ferry to Snug Cove on Bowen Island.

Killarney Lake

What: This is a scenic hiking trail around Killarney Lake on Bowen Island. Along the way, you’ll meander through lush forest of hemlock, and past a marsh of eerie looking cedar stumps, as well as enjoy lakeside views of the wintry waters.

How long: 2 hours or 9 km

Where: Starts and ends at the ferry terminal at Snug Cove, Bowen Island

Get there: A 45-minute drive from downtown Vancouver to Horseshoe Bay, then a 20-minute ferry to Snug Cove on Bowen Island.

Dorman Point

Happy Place, open to receive whatever it is I need. Really enjoying the nice weather in Vancouver.

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What: A pretty, steep, but quick hike on Bowen Island, offering beautiful views looking out over Howe Sound. This can easily be combined with the hike around Killarney Lake.

How long: 1 hour or 2.5 km

Where: Starts and ends at the ferry terminal at Snug Cove, Bowen Island

Get there: A 45-minute drive from downtown Vancouver to Horseshoe Bay, then a 20-minute ferry to Snug Cove on Bowen Island.

Port Moody and surrounding area

Sendero Diez Vistas–Port Moody

What: This challenging hike around Buntzen Lake in Port Moody offers you 10 beautiful views. Take in everything from the surrounding lakes and mountains to Deep Cove, downtown Vancouver, and Indian Arm. If you don’t feel like hiking, you can always take a refreshing dip in the lakeside beaches instead.

How long: Up to 7 hours or 15 km

Where: Starts and ends at the Buntzen Lake parking lot in Port Moody.

Get there: A one-hour drive from downtown, or take the SkyTrain to Port Moody, then bus 182.

Jug Island Beach–Belcarra


What: This hike takes you through a moss-covered forest to a beach facing Jug Island, a tiny, gorgeous and inaccessible island just off the northern tip of Belcarra Regional Park. You’ll also be able to enjoy good views of Indian Arm and numerous eagle and seal sightings.

How long: 2.5 hours or 5.5 km

Where: Starts and ends at the parking lot of Belcarra Regional Park – off Bedwell Bay Road, near Belcarra

Get there: A 1-hour drive from downtown Vancouver, or take the SkyTrain to Port Moody, then bus 182.

Swan Falls–Anmore

#buntzenlake #swanfalls

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What: Swan Falls, near Buntzen Lake in Anmore, are reached by a steep, intermediate hike around the lake. Not only will you get a gorgeous view of the waterfall from below, you’ll also be able to reach the bluffs near the top of the falls too.

How long: 3.5 hours or 10 km

Where: Trail starts and ends at the dog off-leash area in the Buntzen Lake Recreation Area parking lot, off Sunnyside Road in Anmore, north of Port Moody.

Get there: A one-hour drive from downtown Vancouver, or take the SkyTrain to Port Moody, then bus 182.

Admiralty Point–Belcarra

there are no limits to exploration 📸: @jayson_715

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What: This short hike in Belcarra Regional Park offers gorgeous views of Mount Seymour, Deep Cove, and Burnaby Mountain over the waters that link Indian Arm and Burrard Inlet. The trail meanders through the forest and along the shoreline to a rocky outcrop and beach.

How long: 1.5 hours or 5 km

Where: Trail begins and ends in the parking lot of Belcarra Regional Park, off Bedwell Bay Road in Belcarra.

Get there: One hour’s drive from Vancouver, or take the SkyTrain to Port Moody, then bus 182.

Burnaby

Burnaby Lake Regional Park


What: Burnaby Lake is the largest lake in Metro Vancouver and boasts a 10 kilometre hiking path that loops around the entire park. Look out for ducks, geese, and beavers, as you stroll over boardwalks and bridges, alongside the lake and over creeks.

How long: 2 hours or 10 km

Where: The trail starts along the edge of the sports fields beyond the Rugby Club, off Kensington Avenue in Burnaby.

Get there: A 30-minute drive from downtown Vancouver, or take the SkyTrain to Sperling-Burnaby Lake Station.

Burnaby Mountain


What: With multiple trails of various difficulties, also popular with mountain bikers, there’s no shortage of hiking potential on Burnaby Mountain. Watch out for the aptly named steep Cardiac Hill, but enjoy the green forest and city views.

How long: Up to 3 hours or 7 km

Where: Starts and ends at the eastern edge of Pipeline Trail off North Road in Burnaby.

Get there: Either a 35-minute drive from downtown Vancouver, or take the SkyTrain to Burquitlam Station.

Deer Lake

Burnaby sunsets

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What: This flat, easy walk around Deer Lake passes by a beach, a viewing tower, and a pier. Look out for the former site of the infamous Oakalla Prison, and stop in at the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts and Burnaby Art Museum along the way.

How long: An hour or 5 km

Where: Trail starts and ends on the east side of the lake along Sperling Avenue, Burnaby

Get there: A 30-minute drive from downtown Vancouver, or take the SkyTrain to Metrotown and get bus 144.

Velodrome Trail

What: This steep trail is sometimes referred to as Burnaby’s [Grouse] Grind and requires hikers to walk up more than 500 wooden stairs. As a result, it gets an “intermediate” rating.

How long: An hour or 3 km

Where: Starts at the northeast corner of the Velodrome near the Barnet Road and finishes at the Japanese totem poles near Horizon Restaurant in Burnaby

Get there: A 30-minute drive from downtown Vancouver, or take bus 160 direct to the Velodrome.

Coquitlam

Crystal Falls

Wet walk to crystal falls 💦 🌲🗣

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What: Scenic Crystal Falls in Coquitlam are easily accessible on a short trail, running along the Upper Coquitlam River. Wander through a moss-covered forest, hop over tiny streams, play along the path, and pack a picnic for when you reach the falls.

How long: 2 hours or 7 km

Where: Trail starts and ends at an unmarked trailhead on Karley Crescent, where it meets Shaughnessy Street, in Coquitlam.

Get there: A 45-minute drive from downtown Vancouver, or take the SkyTrain to Lafarge-Lake Douglas, then bus 188.

Sawblade Falls

Thick trunk, soft glow 💡 • 📸: @billyyythekidd

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What: You can reach Sawblade Falls, in the mountains above Coquitlam, on the Woodland Walk Trail. Through forest and over creeks, the trail takes you first to Woodland Falls and then after several switchbacks to the much more spectacular Sawblade Falls.

How long: 3 hours or 8 km

Where: Trail starts and ends to the left of the metal gate at the end of Harper Road, just before the PoCo & District Hunting & Fishing Club, in Coquitlam.

Get there: A 45-minute drive from downtown Vancouver.

Maple Ridge

Kanaka Creek Cliff Falls


What: The Cliff Falls area of Kanaka Creek in Maple Ridge is a great spot for an easy hike through the forest, past calm creeks and rushing rapids. Enjoy a picnic with a view of the waterfall then finish up with a visit to the local salmon hatchery.

How long: 2 hours or 4 km

Where: Trail starts and ends at Cliff Park – 251 Street, Maple Ridge.

Get there: A one-hour drive from downtown Vancouver, or take the SkyTrain to Braid Station, then buses 791 and C48.

Mike Lake

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What: This short, scenic trail in Golden Ears Provincial Park is a meander over tree roots, through calm forest and past lake views. Don’t forget to head out onto the dock for a full view of Mike Lake before you leave.

How long: 45 minutes or 2 km

Where: About 4.5 km from the gates of Golden Ears Provincial Park on Fern Avenue in Maple Ridge

Get there: One hour and 30 minutes’ drive from downtown Vancouver.

Gold Creek Falls


What: The walk to Gold Creek Falls in Golden Ears Provincial Park is short but sweet. Starting near Alouette Lake in Maple Ridge, the trail meanders over moss, past mountain vistas and through rainforest to reach fantastic views of the falls from above and below.

How long: 2 hours or 5.5 km

Where: Trail starts and ends at the last parking lot on Golden Ears Parkway near Alouette Lake in Maple Ridge.

Get there: One hour and 30 minutes’ drive from downtown Vancouver.

Pitt Meadows

Widgeon Falls

Summer is back!!

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What: A trip to Widgeon Falls, north of Pitt Meadows, allows you to combine a canoe ride, a scenic hike and some wading all in one day. Keep an eye out for herons, deer, and bears as you make your way from shoreline to waterfall through thick forest.

How long: 5 hours or 6 km

Where: Paddle starts and ends at Pitt Lake, at the end of Neaves Road, north of Pitt Meadows. If you need a canoe, try Pitt Lake Canoe Adventure Rentals on 778-984-5334 or 604-460-8837.

Get there: One hour and 15 minutes’ drive from downtown Vancouver.

Surrey

Aldergrove Regional Park


What: This park on the boundary between Aldergrove and Langley is popular with horseback riders. The trails within take you through the forest, along waterways, atop wooden bridges and over creeks. The view from the area’s rolling hills is worth checking out.

How long: 2 hours or 5 km

Where: Trail starts and ends at the east end of the parking lot off 8th Avenue in Aldergrove.

Get there: A one hour 30 minute drive from downtown Vancouver.

Campbell Valley Regional Park


What: This park has a sprawling network of trails covering 29 km, through forest and open fields, and over wooden boardwalks and marshes. Look out for the Equestrian Centre and the historic Langley Speedway, where you can still see the damage from past crashes.

How long: 1.5 hours or 4 km for a short hike – or pick a longer one!

Where: Trail starts and ends at the south end of the parking lot off 16th Avenue in Surrey.

Get there: An hour’s drive from downtown Vancouver.

Tynehead Regional Park


What: This popular park has plenty of trails, offering dog off-leash areas, a hatchery, a picnic area, views of the park and the Serpentine River – all while enjoying a stroll through the forest and crossing several streams.

How long: 1.5 hours or 4.5 km

Where: Trail starts and ends at the parking lot for the Tynehead Hatchery off 96th Avenue in Surrey.

Get there: A 45-minute drive from downtown Vancouver, or take the SkyTrain to Surrey Central Station, then bus 337.

Derby Reach Regional Park

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What: An easy-to-walk trail with minimal elevation features a camping area, an off-leash area for dogs and trails that hug the Fraser River.

How long: 2.5 hours or 8 km

Where: Trail starts from either the Edgewater Bar area or the Historic Area.

Get there: A one hour drive from downtown Vancouver.

Serpentine Fen Nature Trail 

What: The scenic walk through a nature reserve is a popular spot for bird watchers. Over 100 different species frequent the area based on the time of year.

How long: 1.5 hours or 3.5 km

Where: The trail starts from the gravel parking area of King George Blvd, just north of 44th avenue.

Get there: A 45-minute drive from downtown Vancouver.

Fraser Valley

Hayward Lake–Mission

What: There are two trails around Hayward Lake–Railway Trail or Reservoir Trail. At the moment, there is work being done on the Ruskin Dam area which links them, so it’s not possible to do a loop, but there’s lush forest, a beautiful lake, and even a waterfall to enjoy.

How long: The Railway Trail is 3.5 hours or 12km, the Reservoir Trail is 5.5 hours or 17 km.

Where: Both trails start and end at Hayward Lake Recreation Area parking lot, off Dewdney Trunk Road in Mission.

Get there: A one hour 20 minute drive from downtown Vancouver.

Teapot Hill – Cultus Lake

What: A short hike uphill reveals a stunning view of Cultus Lake. The hike is filled with a mix of deciduous and coniferous trees and a beautiful mix of wild flowers. The trail itself is also packed with teapots hidden along the path.

How long: 2 hours or 5 km

Where: Park in the Teapot Hill parking lot and start the hike heading uphill, there will be an outhouse and park map on the left.

Get there: A 1 hr 40 minute drive from downtown Vancouver

Mount Thom–Chilliwack

🌳🌿🍃🌲

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What: This steep hike up Mount Thom in Chilliwack offers a scenic view of Cultus Lake and the Fraser Valley. Expect a climb steadily upwards, on both switchbacks and long stretches of trail wrapping around the mountain.

How long: 2.5 hours or 10 km

Where: Starts and ends at Sylvan Drive – Promontory neighbourhood, Chilliwack

Get there: A 1 hour 30 minute drive from downtown Vancouver.

Sumas Mountain–Abbotsford


What: The difficult hike up Sumas Mountain takes you through lush forest, over a river running through a ravine, and up, up, up onto an often overgrown, sometimes narrow trail. Along the way, take in the beautiful Chadsey Lake and Fraser Valley vistas, before hitting the top for views of Mount Baker on a clear day. Not recommended before May.

How long: 6.5 hours or 13.5 km

Where: The trailhead is marked with orange markers about 9 km down Sumas Mountain Road after the turnoff from North Parallel Road, in Abbotsford.

Get there: A one hour 30 minute drive from downtown Vancouver.

Seven Sisters Trail – Cultus Lake 

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What: A short hike in the Cultus Lake area brings hikers to a grove of old-growth douglas fir trees. While there were once seven humongous trees, only three remain – although their sheer size is more than impressive.

How long: 1 hr or 3 km

Where: The trail begins from either the Entrance Bay Campground or the Clear Creek Campground.

Get there: A one hour 40 minute drive from downtown Vancouver

Sea-To-Sky

Brandywine Falls

What: Brandywine Falls are another great spot to stretch your legs on the drive to Whistler. With only a short walk, you’ll get a glorious view of the cascading water falling into a cavern full of rock slides below. Further along, you can also see Daisy Lake.

How long: 30 minutes or 1 km

Where: Trail starts and ends at the Brandywine Falls parking lot off the Sea To Sky Highway, about 11 km south of Whistler.

Get there: One hour and 40 minutes’ drive from downtown Vancouver.

Crooked Falls

Such an amazing hike to Crooked Falls near Squamish

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What: You can reach the remote Crooked Falls on the Sigurd Creek Trail, a tough, uphill hike north of Squamish that will reward you with spectacular views. This is a wilderness area so be prepared.

How long: 4 hours or 6 km

Where: 36 km north of Squamish; the Sigurd Creek trailhead is on the left side of the road 2.4 km after turning left onto Ashlu Road from Squamish Valley Road.

Get there: One hour and 30 minutes drive from downtown Vancouver.

High Falls

don’t look down. #highfallscreek

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What: The trail to High Falls is aptly named – if you’re afraid of heights, it may not be for you. Do not look down. Use the ropes and scramble over those rocks. In return, you’ll be rewarded with stunning views of the waterfall and several mountain vistas.

How long: 5 hours or 12 km

Where: Trail begins about 23.5 kilometres down the Squamish Valley Road, off the Sea To Sky Highway.

Get there: A two-hour drive from downtown Vancouver.

Stawamus Chief – Squamish

Second peak on the Stawamus Chief in Squamish, British Columbia (Pierre Leclerc/Shutterstock)

Second peak on the Stawamus Chief in Squamish, British Columbia (Pierre Leclerc/Shutterstock)

What: Tough it to the top of the second biggest granite monolith in the world and spectacular ocean and mountain views await you. Wear proper hiking boots though – this hike involves chains, ropes and a lot of boulders. (If you want to enjoy the view, but not the hike, take the Sea To Sky Gondola instead.)

How long: 6 hours or 11 km

Where: Starts and ends at the Shannon Falls parking lot, off the Sea To Sky Highway before you get to Squamish.

Get there: A one-hour drive from downtown.

Lions Bay Loop

What: A relatively easy-to-do hike passes by a number of viewpoints. Catch a view of the Howe Sound and Crystal Falls before returning to the start of the trail.

How long: 2 hours or 4.5 km

Where: The trailhead can be found on the other side of Centre Road by the Lions Bay General Store and Cafe.

Get there: A 40-minute drive from downtown Vancouver.

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Vincent Plana
Gets his info on NHL prospects from playing Franchise Mode on NHL 18.

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