Endy donates mattresses to frontline workers at BC hospital

Apr 2 2020, 7:06 am

Frontline workers at Vancouver’s St.Paul’s hospital anesthesiology department will soon be able to get some much-needed rest thanks to a donation of mattresses from Endy.

The Canadian company recently donated multiple mattresses, pillows, and mattress protectors to the hospital to ensure ICU and CCU staff would be able to rest comfortably on their breaks while they deal with an onslaught of cases during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

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“At St. Paul’s Hospital, it has been inspiring to see how our multi-disciplinary teams have come together to battle COVID-19,” said Dr. Shannon Lockhart, consultant anesthesiologist at St. Paul’s Hospital, adding that the team reached out to Endy when after finding the “significant increase in night shifts we would need to do to support our colleagues.”

“We initially asked for a few mattresses and Endy gave us enough to distribute amongst various teams in the hospital,” she said.

According to Rajen Ruparell, executive chairman and co-founder of Endy, the decision to donate mattress one was an easy one.

“Imagine being away from your loved ones, fighting a virus that has been sweeping the globe, working countless hours, day and night, to care for those in need. This is the experience of frontline healthcare workers coast-to-coast and around the world,” he said in a statement.

“Recently, we were devastated to learn that medical staff at St. Paul’s Hospital — the doctors and nurses going to battle for us — were sleeping on hospital stretchers, just to get by. We knew we had to help.”

 

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Ruparell says the donation is a reflection of our love and appreciation for healthcare workers across Canada. It has been inspiring to see our country come together during these uncertain times, helping in any way they can.”

For Lockhart, the mattress donation means much more than being able to catch shut-eye during breaks.

“It’s gestures like Endy’s that make us feel supported and cared for by our community,” she said. “We are beyond grateful.”