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Porn in the cockpit: Air Canada's memo to pilots

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DH Vancouver Staff Sep 25, 2014 9:45 am

Air Canada pilots have a bad habit of leaving their pornographic materials behind in the cockpit, according to an internal company memo.

The memo, published by CBC News, was circulated last year, and warns pilots they could be subject to prosecution if they continue to neglect to remove “inappropriate material” from the flight deck when their shift is over.

The issue at Air Canada was brought to light six years ago by a female pilot who attests she found pornographic materials “displayed, glued and tucked in a variety of areas in the cockpit on Air Canada’s Embraer fleet of planes,” according to CBC. The materials are mostly “business cards” showing sexually explicit images.

Those particular planes are used on AC routes to and from Las Vegas; the incidents, say the airline, are isolated to that route.

Transport Canada, who oversees the airline industry, investigated the employee’s claim that the paper materials stuck into areas where there is wiring posed a safety threat, along with the safety issue of distracted pilots. The claimant also said the pornographic materials constitute “workplace violence.”

The agency’s notes, also published by CBC News, indicate Transport Canada “tried to get Air Canada to take the problem more seriously.”

Air Canada says when they learned of the problem they took “corrective action through pilot training.”

Angela Mah, a media relations rep for Air Canada, told Vancity Buzz in an e-mail:

When made aware of this issue, Air Canada had a thorough investigation undertaken by an independent third party. It determined the frequency with which such materials were found to be limited. Air Canada has a strict zero tolerance policy to protect its employees against harassment of any kind, including inappropriate materials that may offend co-workers. Air Canada took immediate corrective action to adapt its pilot training accordingly and regularly reminds employees that such materials are not tolerated in the workplace. No additional materials of this nature have been reported since February 2014.

Other North American airlines have dealt with lawsuits in the last couple of decades stemming from pilots putting pornographic materials inside their cockpits, according to The Province.

Featured image: An Air Canada E190 departs Las Vegas (g Tarded/Flickr)

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D8d194f40cb13417f79d4d8daee34fdb?s=96&d=mm&r=g
DH Vancouver Staff
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