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80% of Canadians prefer to say 'Merry Christmas' over 'Happy Holidays': survey

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DH Vancouver Staff Dec 23, 2014 7:47 pm

Should you say ‘Merry Christmas’ or ‘Happy Holidays’ in your greeting? It is always a question to ponder over at this time of year.

However, a new survey by Angus Reid Institute has found that a vast majority of Canadians prefer to say ‘Merry Christmas’. The survey was conducted across the country and asked more than 1,500 Canadian adults on their preferences and what the season meant to them.

More than 80 per cent of the respondents prefer to call this time of year “Christmas” instead of the “Holiday Season.”

Celebrating the birth or Christ is what makes Christmas time “special” for 54 per cent of the respondents. In addition, 37 per cent of respondents (twice the normal rate of 18%) will attend Christmas church service while the remaining respondents say they had no plans to do so. Based on statistics, about 10 million Canadians can be expected to attend church on December 25.

Regardless of their religious or cultural backgrounds, 94 per cent say spending time with their friends and family is what makes Christmas special. More than three-quarters also said Christmas time provides a breather from everyday life.

When it comes to gifts or feasts, the much-anticipated Christmas dinner wins by a wide margin. 26 per cent say giving and receiving gifts is what makes gatherings with loved ones so special, but more than twice as many (56%) gave the Christmas dinner more weight.

 

 

Feature Image: Merry Christmas via Shutterstock

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DH Vancouver Staff
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